Cool Paid Ads images

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A few nice paid ads images I found:

Convention Center on Harbor
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Image by Justin in SD
The San Diego convention center has recently been a hot topic for discussion. The Convention Center is in need of an expansion, but there have been debates over the design and how to pay for it. Many have proposed new designs that combined the convention center expansion with a new football stadium, but the cost for such a project will be extremely high. The source of funding for the project has been debated ad nauseum and they don’t seem to be finding an answer. Eventually I’m sure they will come to an agreement on the convention center expansion, hopefully helping to secure the Comic Con convention for at least a few more years. Whether or not a new football stadium will be built still seems to be up in the air. I think the concept is great, they just need to come up with a good way to pay for it, anybody have billion lying around they would like to donate?

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before and after photos not fake/fake
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Image by pumpkincat210
constructive criticism welcome. self portrait. As you can tell, i’m not too into natural and even with a great makeup artist, the camera’s today pick up every detail. While it’s great for some pictures(photographers don’t pay 1000’s of dollars for a camera that doesn’t pick up detail), other pictures, like makeup ads, etc, need extra help. This is not a good representation of photoshop retouching.

Salisbury Cathedral – A Top Glass Example of Early English Architecture!
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Image by antonychammond
Salisbury Cathedral, formally known as the Cathedral Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary, is an Anglican cathedral in Salisbury, England, and is considered one of the leading examples of Early English architecture. The main body was completed in only 38 years, from 1220 to 1258.

The cathedral has the tallest church spire in the United Kingdom (123m/404 ft). Visitors can take the "Tower Tour" where the interior of the hollow spire, with its ancient wood scaffolding, can be viewed. The cathedral also has the largest cloister and the largest cathedral close in Britain (80 acres (320,000 m2)). The cathedral contains the world’s oldest working clock (from AD 1386) and has the best surviving of the four original copies of the Magna Carta (all four original copies are in England). Although commonly known as Salisbury Cathedral, the official name is the Cathedral of Saint Mary. In 2008, the cathedral celebrated the 750th anniversary of its consecration in 1258.

The cathedral is the Mother Church of the Diocese of Salisbury and seat of the Bishop of Salisbury, the Rt Revd Nick Holtam.

As a response to deteriorating relations between the clergy and the military at Old Sarum, the decision was taken to resite the cathedral and the bishopric was moved to its present place in Salisbury. The move occurred during the tenure of Bishop Richard Poore, who was a wealthy man and donated the new land for construction. The new cathedral was also paid for by donations, principally by all the canons and vicars of South East England, who were asked to contribute a fixed annual sum until its completion. Legend has it that the Bishop of Old Sarum shot an arrow in the direction he would build the cathedral; the arrow hit a deer and the deer finally died in the place where Salisbury Cathedral is now.

The foundation stone was laid on 28 April 1220. Much of the freestone for the cathedral came from Teffont Evias quarries. Due to the high water table in the new location, the cathedral was built on only four feet of foundations, and by 1258 the nave, transepts and choir were complete. The west front was ready by 1265. The cloisters and chapter house were completed around 1280. Because the cathedral was built in only 38 years, it has a single consistent architectural style, Early English Gothic.

The only major sections of the cathedral built later were the cloisters, chapter house, tower and spire, which at 404 feet (123 m) dominated the skyline from 1320. Although the spire is the cathedral’s most impressive feature, it has also proved to be troublesome. Together with the tower, it added 6,397 tons (6,500 tonnes) to the weight of the building. Without the addition of buttresses, bracing arches and anchor irons over the succeeding centuries, it would have suffered the fate of spires on later great ecclesiastical buildings (such as Malmesbury Abbey) and fallen down; instead, Salisbury remains the tallest church spire in the UK. To this day the large supporting pillars at the corners of the spire are seen to bend inwards under the stress. The addition of reinforcing tie beams above the crossing, designed by Christopher Wren in 1668, arrested further deformation. The beams were hidden by a false ceiling, installed below the lantern stage of the tower.

Significant changes to the cathedral were made by the architect James Wyatt in 1790, including replacement of the original rood screen and demolition of the bell tower which stood about 320 feet (100 m) north west of the main building. Salisbury is one of only three English cathedrals to lack a ring of bells, the others being Norwich Cathedral and Ely Cathedral. However it does strike the time every 15 minutes with bells.

For further information please visit
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salisbury_Cathedral and www.salisburycathedral.org.uk/visitor.php

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